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Preserving Your Breast with
Breast Conservation Therapy (BCT)

PRESENT

BCT is a breakthrough procedure of lumpectomy + breast radiotherapy, resulting in similar local control rates as mastectomy, allowing women to keep their breast.

Modern surgical and radiotherapy techniques have further enhanced patient outcomes, such that surgical scars are much smaller and hidden. Oncoplastic surgery repairs the cavity from the lumpectomy and radiotherapy is given over much shorter duration, and side effects are usually no more than a mild sun tan!

 

Under good hands, thousands of women have been able to keep breast in good natural shape without the need for any complicated surgeries or procedures which may entail all kinds of risks.

Breast Conservation Therapy

Credit: Anaono

1990s

For breast cancer patients who must undergo a mastectomy, they now have the option to preserve their own skin and nipple. However, the procedures are long (10 hour surgery) and complicated with risks including the nipple falling out due to a lack of blood supply.

Due to the need for multiple procedures, recovery is lengthy and delicate. Sometimes patients require a correction surgery to adjust the appearance of the ‘new breast’ so as to make it equal to the other. Sometimes, radiotherapy is needed after the breast reconstruction to eradicate remnant cancer cells, and the risk of implant failure is as high as 30% due to the more vulnerable reconstructed tissues. Imaging after reconstruction to look for possible recurrences is also more difficult due to the new implants and surgical changes which can obscure the view of new growths.

Breast Conservation Therapy

1940s

Eight decades ago, mastectomy (complete removal of breast tissue) was the only surgical option which resulted in disfigurement and asymmetry of the chest. Side effects included chest, shoulder and arm tightness and arm swelling.

Breast Conservation Therapy
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